Graffiti


At various times, all sorts of informal certficates, notes, TWXs, sketches, etc, did the rounds at Honeysuckle. Here’s the start of a collection...


See also Mike Dinn’s Apollo Memorabillia pages.



HSK songs

Honeysuckle Songsclick here.





Honeysuckle People

Mike Linney drew this cartoon of Honeysuckle Creek in 1966.

It was modelled after the popular ‘Ettamogah Pub’ cartoons by Ken Maynard in the Australasian Post magazine. Many Honeysuckle staff and visitors, including several Apollo astronauts, signed it – up until the end of the lunar landing missions in 1972.

(Here’s Apollo 17 LMP Jack Schmitt signing it.)

This copy with thanks to Stew Burton.

Large, Larger.

Honeysuckle People

Phil Maier was given this signed banner in 1980 when he left Honeysuckle Creek.

Click the image for a larger version, or here for a 2MB version.




DSE Dump cert

To illustrate the problems of completing post pass reports – here is a bit of Graffiti...

A certificate for correcting many DSE dump report messages! The DSE Dump report message was a report sent after receiving a high speed data playback from the CSM data recorder.

We sent various written (fixed format) reports via TTY. These were usually prepared by the various sections but Checked by the Ops console people (usually me :-).

Someone may also have kept an actual report message...

Scan and notes by John Saxon.
The “certificate” is signed by Laurie Turner.


Dim Sims

Scanned by John Saxon.




Laurie Turner cartoon

During the Deep Space days there was a gripe about certain shifts getting all the money so Laurie Turner drew this cartoon to draw attention to how the shifts saw the situation.

Scan and text: Hamish Lindsay.




HSK stamp

Although the Australian Post Office never issued a stamp to commemorate the Apollo missions, the Honeysuckle Creek Department of Supply Administration Officer, Milton Turner, produced an envelope for philatelic buffs which was posted on the day of the last Apollo mission, Apollo 17.

An insert for the envelope gave a brief description of the station and the manned missions.

Scan and text: Hamish Lindsay.




cartoon

This is a cartoon I did when we were all facing redundancy. It shows how I felt at the end; the executives trying to hold back the big payouts we expected – as we all sweated on our futures.

Scan and text: Hamish Lindsay.




last lunch

TSS secretary Lisa Jensen drew up a memento for the last Apollo lunch (Apollo 17) in the station canteen on 19 December 1972 and managed to win a couple of signatures.

Scan and text: Hamish Lindsay.





A Guided tour of Honeysuckle

John Saxon has supplied these notes for conducting guided tours at Honeysuckle.

He thinks they were written by Milton Turner. This particular set dates from mid to late 1970.

Click on each image for the full size version.

page 1
page 2
Page 1
Page 2
page 3
page 4

Page 3

Page 4





The Apollo–Soyuz Test Program

Apollo-Soyuz problems
The Apollo-Soyuz Test Program
was a test of hardware compatibility as well as of international goodwill. But would it work? Ed von Renouard drew this sketch to illustrate the pitfalls. c. 1975.




 

A Sago of Parkes

A Sago of Parkes

A Sago of Parkes

The bearer at Orange was Green,
At Coonable* it was also seen,
But the wind it just blew the data askew,
From the alternate link, not a bean.

Data from Parkes will get through,
With sunshine and skies of clear blue,
If the wind tends to blow,
We get lots of snow,
From Deakin and Williamsdale too.

The brave PMG they set out,
To fix up the trouble no doubt,
But at Williamsdale it was blowing a gale,
It was not a retreat more a rout.

Surely somebody could think,
To design a waterproof link,
Unaffected by snow or wnds that might blow,
The designer will get a free drink.

* probably meant to be Coonambro. Mt. Coonambro, south-southeast of Parkes, relayed data from Parkes to Orange.

The data from Parkes was sent to the Deakin switch in Canberra, then to Red Hill and via microwave to the country exchange at Williamsdale, on the hills east of Honeysuckle, and then down to the station.

We’re not sure who wrote this – but Laurie Turner, or Mike Linney are prime suspects. Does anyone know? Scan by John Saxon.





When John Saxon spoke with Apollo 16

Apollo 16 voice uplink

After John Saxon spoke with John Young and Charlie Duke on the lunar surface
during Apollo 16, this poem was penned by someone to commemorate the occasion.
(Read about the incident here.)

Scan: John Saxon.